Cultural References

Al Capone (People)

"Veronica, the sheriff wants to have a look inside your locker."
"Course he does. Just out of curiosity, what are you gentlemen hoping to find in here? Al Capone? The Lindbergh baby?"

Chicago resident Al Capone, arguably one of America's most well-known mobsters and murderers, was ultimately indicted and convicted for 18 counts of income-tax evasion in 1932. While imprisoned at Alcatraz, he suffered from syphilitic dementia and, when released, was unable to run the crime syndicate for which he became famous. Kidnapping and aiding and abetting a felon — two crimes that Veronica actually, at this point in time, has not committed. Charles Lindbergh, Jr., infant son of the first man to fly solo across the Atlantic, was kidnapped from his nursery on March 1, 1932, in what many consider to be "The Crime of the Century." Despite the family's payment of the $70,000 ransom demanded by the kidnappers, baby Lindbergh was found dead four miles from his parents' estate on March 12. Bruno Richard Hauptmann was convicted for the child's murder, though conspiracy theorists insist he was not the culprit. Hard to believe, however, that 18-year-old Veronica is.

1.12 "Clash of the Tritons"

Cultural References